Thursday, January 19, 2017

Tuesday, December 6, 2016

Dunkin Donuts is Taking Over Weymouth

Founded by William Rosenthal in 1950 in Quincy, Massachusetts, Dunkin Donuts is a global donut and coffee company. Being based out of Quincy, it’s not unusual to see a store or two in surrounding towns like Braintree, Milton or Hingham for example. However, Weymouth tends to have not one.. not three.. but NINE different Dunkin Donuts locations!
            There are four sections of Weymouth: North (a.k.a N-Dub), East (a.k.a E-Dub), South (a.k.a S-Dub… just kidding, it’s just South), and Weymouth Landing (a.k.a the Landing). According to my map, there are at least two Dunkin Donuts locations in each section of Weymouth. Also, I noted the short distance between some of them, not just in miles but also in FEET! It's remarkable how many there are in such a short distance to each other.

            Now,  Bostonians in Weymouth have no need to drive to the nearest Dunkin Donuts locations. They just have to kick on their sneakers and walk to the nearest one, which is surely only a minimum 20-minute walk from every part of town! Or, they could save time and resources and brew their own coffee at home.



**Side-note: Sorry Dr. Hayes-Bohanan for mentioning Coffee Hell **

Thursday, December 1, 2016

South Dakota: A Far & Different Land From New England

Greetings Fellow Geographers,

For this map-blog assignment, I decided to create a map via Google Maps' 'My Maps' option and focus on South Dakota, a place I have not been to before, but will have the opportunity coming next spring.
My focus for this map was to highlight the American Indian reservation lands within South Dakota and plot  locations of interest that connect to these reservations and the Sioux Native American tribes.

Why choose South Dakota out of no-where you may ask? This past month I had applied and was accepted to participate in the BSU Community Service Center's Alternative Spring Break program, was of a lucky few picked to be a part of the ASB's trip to the Sioux YMCA in Dupree, South Dakota. This will be the first time I will be able to immerse myself within Native American culture, visit a reservation and also experience this part of the country. To help spread more information about the Sioux, reservations and the vast space of lands west of the Mississippi River, I thought creating a map to show where I'll be visiting next spring would be helpful. Considering most New Englanders are not familiar with most of the interior of the United States, I thought this map would be beneficial to my classmates.

The map has two layers, one that highlights the areas in South Dakota that myself and my small group of classmates who will be traveling with will mostly be aware of. The other highlights the other Sioux lands bounded in reservations today, as well as an outline of what was the "Great Sioux Reservation", the first treaty-partitioned land made by the U.S. government in the late 19th century.

The first layer includes the Cheyenne River Reservation, the Sioux land my ASB group will visit and live within for the week of spring break. We will be located in the town of Dupree and serve at the Sioux YMCA, which are both located with individual markers. The town of Eagle Butte, just to the north is located, along with the Cheyenne River Cultural Center, which is the center of the reservation's administration.
The first layer also highlights the Standing Rock Reservation, which is another Sioux reservation land that borders Cheyenne River Reservation within South Dakota and continues into North Dakota. This land should be of some familiarity to most Americans, as there has been a substantial protest near the Sacred Stone Camp (also spotted on my map) for several months against a proposed oil pipeline that would affect sacred lands to the Sioux. I simply added these locations to help show the proximity of the two reservations.
The Black Hills and Badlands National Parks are plotted to show nearby non-Native attractions (although both are sacred to Native Americans) and the Mt. Rushmore & Crazy Horse Monuments. My ASB group may have time to visit one of these locations, or other natural attractions before we begin our service week.

I hope this map helps you learn more about South Dakota and the Sioux people! - SB

Ten Interesting Facts About Brockton


Here is a map showing ten interesting things in the city of Brockton, MA. Many of which people may not be aware of, including residents of this city.


Whenever I get a chance to visit a national/state park I jump at the opportunity! Ever since I was a kid I loved taking long hikes through park, it was always interesting to take a new path and see where it led me. state and national parks have always given me a sense of peace in a chaotic world, in these parks it is quiet, serine, and full of wonder.

A cooler, Oakley sunglasses and a Abu Garcia make a great day.



A cooler, Oakley sunglasses and a Abu Garcia rod is all I need to have a great summer day. Salt water fishing is one of my favorite hobbies and every year my brother and I pick a place to visit on our list. On this map are locations where I have friends who also love to fish and are waiting for me to explore that fishing site. The areas in green are chosen places I have already visited and the areas in red are places I have not explored yet. This summer of 2016 while I was away in military training I still managed to sneak in a fishing session out in Virginia Beach and it was a beautiful time. I am hoping to expand this map and locations as I continue to fish every year. When I complete this map I will create another one with newer locations to explore. If you love to fish I highly recommend some of these places as they are the most exciting places to fish in.

Wednesday, November 30, 2016

Where Did I Come From?

This is a map depicting the ancestry of my family, both past and present. There is quite a lot that is still unknown about my family's past, especially with my paternal grandmother's side as my grandmother passed away at age 50. I hope that viewing the map is an enjoyable experience, getting to see just how diverse my family tree is.

Legend:

The blue stars represent my Paternal Grandfather's ancestry while the blue points represent my Paternal Grandmother's ancestry. The blue squares represent where in the world my father's extended family currently resides.

The coral stars represent my Maternal Grandfather's ancestry while the coral points represent my Maternal Grandmother's ancestry. The coral squares represent where in the world my mother's extended family currently resides.

The yellow square represents where my soon to be in-laws reside and the yellow point represents where they are from.

The purple points represent my immediate family, where we were born and live today.